How To Travel Through Your Buyer’s Journey

The buyer’s journey is a hot topic. Companies are learning that the better we understand who our customers are and what they’re looking for as they barrel, skip, or meander towards a purchase, the better we can keep them engaged through the buying process. And the better we keep them engaged, the more value we can provide.

That value goes both ways, of course: A loyal customer is a paying customer for the long-term. Paving the road of their buyer journey with opportunities to learn, connect, evaluate, share, and even advocate is a worthy investment—one that requires some solid marketing strategy including campaigns to keep customers “biting” on offers that keep them happily engaged.

Here, we’ll take a look at how direct response marketing fits into the various stages of your buyers’ journey.Read more


Real Campaign Examples That Use Emotional Marketing To Drive Response

Googling the term “emotional marketing” yields millions upon millions of results, with relevant information appearing on page after page of ranked content. Yes, it’s a hot topic. It’s always been a hot topic. Humans are emotional creatures—and we’re also consumers. Marketers want to get it right, so we write about it and read about it and do our best to follow best practices to make sure we’re hitting the right emotional targets with the right people at the right time.

Emotional Marketing In Practice
This isn’t our first time addressing the fascinating topic, either. In our post You’ll Love These 4 Ways to Use Emotional Marketing to Boost Response—spoiler alert!—we suggested using emotive language, color theory, images, and social proof to “bring emotion” to your direct response marketing campaigns. We make the point that when you incorporate all four of these elements into your creative strategy, you’re likely to strike an emotional (and motivating!) chord with your audience.

But here, we want to provide some real examples, so you can see how it’s done in the real world of direct response marketing. We can theorize all we want (it’s interesting, isn’t it?), but direct response is all about driving action…so let’s get to it!Read more


Build Brand Advocates and Response with These 5 Steps

Marketers love their brand advocates as much as (maybe more than) their brand advocates love their company. What’s not to love? These customers sing your praises without being asked to, like a doting parent or best friend. But unlike a doting parent or best friend, they’re not obligated to do so. They just honest-to-goodness do.

For the direct response marketer, this means they “take action” without a specific offer from you. They’re so far into their customer journey there’s no looking back—they’re already sold and still buying. Not only will they “click here,” but they’ll recommend you to their friends, family, and colleagues. Is the brand advocate the holy grail of the direct response marketer?

Before we can look at the relationship between brand advocacy and direct response marketing, let’s explore what brand advocates are what they are not.Read more


Achieving Direct Response Offer Consistency

“Consistency is key,” they say. It’s an adage that’s beautifully applied to the practice of direct response marketing—and when it’s done right, it can lead to measurable increases in performance and sales. “Consistency in what?” you may ask. That’s what we’re here to explore.

We’re not talking about brand consistency here. Not exactly. We’re talking about consistency in your direct response offers. While brand consistency plays an important role in building familiarity and trust in your name, products, and services—overarching all of your marketing and sales messages—it’s consistency in your offer-specific messaging and creative that helps drive action and brings you the campaign results you’re aiming for.Read more


How to use Storytelling in Direct Response Marketing

A weary marketing manager sits down at her computer, once again, to review performance results from her most recent direct response campaign. “All of these long hours, the expenses, the planning,” she laments, rubbing her forehead with tired fingertips. What’s the use hiding her frustration? There’s no one left at the office to see or hear her. “Our products are phenomenal!” she cries. “And our customers agree—so why,” she asks the tracking spreadsheet in front of her, “aren’t we attracting new leads?”

Want to know what happens next?Read more