How Direct Response Marketing Can Keep Up With Customers’ Liquid Expectations

Customers compare their experiences with your brand to their experiences with Amazon, Disney, and Starbucks, even if you sell insurance, building supplies, or printing services. And you better believe these interactions are shaping their perceptions of your company—and they’re raising the bar for your direct response marketing efforts, too.

It’s Time to Widen Your Competitive Lens
Who’s setting the bar? Not your direct competitors. In fact, your competitors aren’t often who you think they are. Your competitors are also the brands that your customers engage with on a daily basis. That’s right, these include McDonald’s, Google, PetSmart, and Nike; the brands who pour billions of dollars into marketing research, product development, and advertising. And in the process, they’re redefining the customer experience and driving new consumer demands.

Accenture Interactive’s Fjord agency coined the term “liquid expectations” to describe when customer experiences seep over from one industry to an entirely different industry. For example, a customer might compare their easy-breezy coffee shop mobile ordering and checkout experience with their not-quite-as-simple online life insurance quoting and application process. They’re going to find the insurance company experience lacking. They’re going to feel dissatisfied, on some level, and think, “That should have been a whole lot easier!”

While this is clearly an apples-to-oranges comparison, it signals to insurance companies a need to prioritize the customer experience—an experience that’s getting easier everywhere else. It’s an opportunity to rise to consumers’ digital demands and improve the buyer journey, taking cues from how leading consumer brands are delighting their customers.Read more


Direct Mail and Email: Direct Response Marketing’s Power Couple

In today’s multi-marketing channel universe, it isn’t always easy to determine whether direct mail or email is the better delivery method for your offer…or should even be considered. Both have their pros and cons. But if you think you need to pick one over the other, think again.

We don’t play favorites here. Many times, direct mail and email are better together.Read more


How to Evaluate Direct Marketing Creative: Our 5-Point Checklist

How do you know if your direct marketing creative -- the integration of copy and design ­­-- is up to the task of connecting with the target audience and doing its part to drive a successful campaign? Nothing—no direct mail piece, email, website or social media ad—makes its way out the door without careful evaluation.

  • “It’s pretty” doesn’t necessarily equal “It’s effective.”
  • “That’s such a cool idea” doesn’t always translate to “It’ll resonate with our target market.”
  • “Wow, that really pops!” doesn’t mean “It’s on strategy.”
  • “I wouldn’t respond to that” doesn’t mean “It isn’t right for the target audience.”

Our creative team, which consists of art directors, designers, and copywriters, approach each project with a clean slate—and fresh ideas. But they also takeRead more


37 Power Words to Use in Direct Response Marketing—and Why

 

From the time we were kids, we’ve been told by family members, teachers, and marketing gurus to “use the right words” and avoid using the wrong ones. Most of us have figured out how to communicate effectively—in most situations, anyway—and we know how powerful words can be. The right ones can make your heart sing, and the wrong ones can cut like a knife.

Write the Right Words, All Right?
In direct response marketing, the right words can work like magic. Word choice is fundamental to creating a message that resonates and building an offer and call to action that performs. Let’s take a look at which words tend to “work” for today’s direct response marketersRead more


“Hello, Inbox!” Tips to Improve Direct Response Email Deliverability

What good is a brilliantly crafted direct response email campaign if the offers don’t make it to recipients’ inboxes? The messages can’t be read if they’re bouncing around cyberspace, and response rates suffer. Conversions aren’t what they could be—what they would be—if the campaign had optimum deliverability.

MailChimp defines deliverability as a way to measure the success at which an email marketer gets a campaign into subscribers' inboxes. The concept is actually quite complex, but the main point we want to make here is that there are things you can do to improve your email campaigns’ deliverability.

All it takes is grasping the basics and following some best practices. Shall we?Read more