Too Much of Good Thing?


Written by Account Executive, Kim Chapman

A debate in the email-marketing world has been going on for over a decade: how often to send out emails.

When brushing up on my research, I found advice/factoids concerning this topic from the early 2000s all the way up to this past month. Here are some tidbits:

  • At a minimum, communicate with your customers once a month. If not, you are not staying top of mind.
  • Send e-blasts a maximum of once per week; click-thrus and opens both drop dramatically once you get more frequent than weekly.
  • Declining open rates could signify an increase of indifference towards your brand, possibly caused by over-mailing.
  • If you’re considering an email campaign more frequent than once per week, you have to ask yourself whether the information is really that time sensitive.
  • At a minimum, you should send weekly if you are selling a product or service.

While some of this information is helpful, it seems a bit contradictory. So what’s a marketer to do?

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No Respect...For Email

 

 

 

 

 

Written by Mark Weinstein, President and Owner

Rodney Dangerfield, the iconic comedian who passed away in 2004, was known for the catchphrase in his monologues, "I don't get no respect!."

The same might be said for email.  “No respect.”

With all the noise about the latest social media trends and changes, it’s difficult these days for email to get the respect it is due.  Let’s pay our respects to email.

Since email is very low-cost, it solidifies email marketing as probably the most cost-effective advertising method available today.  The results from our client’s email campaigns continue to reinforce this notion.

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What the Heck is DNT?


Written by Chris Czachor - Account Executive

Last month, my colleague Julie Determann, wrote about online behavioral targeting and how websites and advertisers are leveraging the information gathered online and "following" you around with banner ads and reminders about that shirt or pair of shoes you left in a shopping cart and didn't buy.  This type of targeted advertising is playing a big part of a larger movement that is steadily gaining steam and it is simply called "Do Not Track."

So, what the heck is Do Not Track (DNT) anyway?  Do Not Track is a technology standard intended to allow individual web users to decide whether or not they consent to having their online activities monitored, mostly for the purpose of being served targeted advertising.  Now, to some web users, this sounds amazing, right?  No longer will third-party advertisers and "big brother" be allowed to follow them around the web, right?  Well, not really and before you jump on the Do Not Track bandwagon take a second to think through what it actually will mean.

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What Would Don Draper Do?

Written by Kim Chapman - Account Executive

Thanks to the hit TV show "Mad Men", when I tell people that I work at an advertising agency, I wonder if they picture me sitting around all day drinking whiskey on the rocks, coming up with an uber-creative idea for the next big brand, and asking myself, "What would Don Draper do?"
While some of that is partly true (definitely not the whiskey part), the reality of work at a direct marketing agency involves a whole other side.  The left side... of the brain.
Direct marketing is a different animal from general advertising.  It’s a scientific animal, in which you can use a clear call-to-action, track response and ROI, and then over time improve these measures by finding out what works, and what doesn’t.  (Aka, testing, testing, and … more testing.)
General advertising can be potentially effective at building someone’s emotional awareness or engagement with a brand. But if you want proof of impact on your bottom line, direct marketing is the way to go. This is always a good thing, especially for those with tight budgets.
A good direct marketing campaign will make sure not to use too much unbridled creativity, and a good amount of science (left brain) to ensure that your campaign is successful.

A Day In The Life...

As told by TWO's summer intern - Sean Enright

Before beginning my internship with The Weinstein Organization, I never looked at a website or an email campaign and thought about it in any other way than myself as a consumer.  Since starting in May, when I click to a website or read my emails, I look at these marketing tools in a completely different context.

When dealing with our client, Weight Watchers, I have to get out of the mindset of being a 22 year old male.  I have to think and look at what we are doing as someone completely different.  I never thought I would be spending days at the office in the mindset of a man or woman, who is trying to lose weight, and 30 years or older looking to change their life.

Each day I look at what we are doing for Weight Watchers and try to put myself into the shoes of these people.  When they open an email or go to a website, what do they want to see that will make them want to keep reading or keep clicking through?  We want to push people to join and we have to do that by putting material on our websites and emails that is informative and exciting.

To get ideas of how to do this I am beginning to look at what other websites and email campaigns do for their target audiences.  When I get an email from Sports Authority with their summer deals, I look at it to see how they convey their information and make their material look exciting.  That helps me get ideas to use for when we do our next Weight Watchers website or email.

This is something that was so surprising to me when I started.  When I get these emails or view a website, I am now looking for ideas to use for our clients or try to critique what another company is currently doing with their material.

It has only been a little over a month with The Weinstein Organization and I already look at websites and email campaigns in a new light, as marketing tools.  I guess that means I am officially a marketer.