The Long and Short of Email Copy

Written by: Mark Weinstein, President

Since it is important to quickly grab the attention of an email reader, most email marketers believe, and rightly so, that emails should be visually engaging, short in length and contain a very focused call-to-action.  Most often the goal is to get the reader to click through to a website or microsite.

We agree.  But, are there times when a long copy approach in email makes sense?  Yes.

In a recent series of tests for one of our retail clients we tested a long email with multiple visually impactful coupons versus a short email with one visually engaging coupon and clickable links to the other offers.  The coupon offers and the email broadcast dates were constant. We virtually saw no difference in open rates, click-throughs and most importantly, conversion to sale, between the two email lengths.

But, there are situations when email marketers should consider a bit more copy to engage the reader build relationships and increase clicks.

An Apple online computer accessories and supply company, Other World Computing, effectively builds relationships with its customers with a long copy approach.  Their emails have a friendly, conversational style that often digress into topics like support for the troops, and makes the reader feel he/she received a personal email.  However, throughout the email are tips, links to instructional videos and software updates, and many special, often limited-time, customer-only offers.

Time and Space Toys sells nostalgic collectibles and toys, such as Peanuts, The Grinch and Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer. They use a newsletter email format, offering details and images from a variety of lines and products. It's the email version of searching through a bin of goodies at a flea market.  Readers keep scrolling hoping to find a special discovery somewhere within the email. Collectors appreciate detailed information, and are willing to take the time to read through copy before clicking through.

If building relationships, sales and making your customers and prospects feel like there are real people on the other side, try a personal long-copy approach.  The results may surprise you.


Too Much of Good Thing?


Written by Account Executive, Kim Chapman

A debate in the email-marketing world has been going on for over a decade: how often to send out emails.

When brushing up on my research, I found advice/factoids concerning this topic from the early 2000s all the way up to this past month. Here are some tidbits:

  • At a minimum, communicate with your customers once a month. If not, you are not staying top of mind.
  • Send e-blasts a maximum of once per week; click-thrus and opens both drop dramatically once you get more frequent than weekly.
  • Declining open rates could signify an increase of indifference towards your brand, possibly caused by over-mailing.
  • If you’re considering an email campaign more frequent than once per week, you have to ask yourself whether the information is really that time sensitive.
  • At a minimum, you should send weekly if you are selling a product or service.

While some of this information is helpful, it seems a bit contradictory. So what’s a marketer to do?

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No Respect...For Email

 

 

 

 

 

Written by Mark Weinstein, President and Owner

Rodney Dangerfield, the iconic comedian who passed away in 2004, was known for the catchphrase in his monologues, "I don't get no respect!."

The same might be said for email.  “No respect.”

With all the noise about the latest social media trends and changes, it’s difficult these days for email to get the respect it is due.  Let’s pay our respects to email.

Since email is very low-cost, it solidifies email marketing as probably the most cost-effective advertising method available today.  The results from our client’s email campaigns continue to reinforce this notion.

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What the Heck is DNT?


Written by Chris Czachor - Account Executive

Last month, my colleague Julie Determann, wrote about online behavioral targeting and how websites and advertisers are leveraging the information gathered online and "following" you around with banner ads and reminders about that shirt or pair of shoes you left in a shopping cart and didn't buy.  This type of targeted advertising is playing a big part of a larger movement that is steadily gaining steam and it is simply called "Do Not Track."

So, what the heck is Do Not Track (DNT) anyway?  Do Not Track is a technology standard intended to allow individual web users to decide whether or not they consent to having their online activities monitored, mostly for the purpose of being served targeted advertising.  Now, to some web users, this sounds amazing, right?  No longer will third-party advertisers and "big brother" be allowed to follow them around the web, right?  Well, not really and before you jump on the Do Not Track bandwagon take a second to think through what it actually will mean.

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What Would Don Draper Do?

Written by Kim Chapman - Account Executive

Thanks to the hit TV show "Mad Men", when I tell people that I work at an advertising agency, I wonder if they picture me sitting around all day drinking whiskey on the rocks, coming up with an uber-creative idea for the next big brand, and asking myself, "What would Don Draper do?"
While some of that is partly true (definitely not the whiskey part), the reality of work at a direct marketing agency involves a whole other side.  The left side... of the brain.
Direct marketing is a different animal from general advertising.  It’s a scientific animal, in which you can use a clear call-to-action, track response and ROI, and then over time improve these measures by finding out what works, and what doesn’t.  (Aka, testing, testing, and … more testing.)
General advertising can be potentially effective at building someone’s emotional awareness or engagement with a brand. But if you want proof of impact on your bottom line, direct marketing is the way to go. This is always a good thing, especially for those with tight budgets.
A good direct marketing campaign will make sure not to use too much unbridled creativity, and a good amount of science (left brain) to ensure that your campaign is successful.